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• What are you reading?

The Buried Giant, by Kazuo Ishiguro, for SF book group. A third of the way in. We're not getting along very well. Everything is mysterious. Some things are portentous. No one understands anything, but no one is very bothered, because no one remembers anything. Except in fragments. One mysterious woman told the same story as another mysterious woman. A strange warrior keeps giving our main character significant looks: does he remember something that the MC does not? Another odd figure was going to tell us his theory, but he has to leave. He's back. His theory is that maybe it's not just the characters who are senile; maybe God is also going senile.

I think I am going to get to the end of this book and ask, "What was that all about?" And the book will answer, "I don't know, Susan. What do you think that was all about?"

• What did you recently finish reading?

The Left Hand of Darkness, by Ursula K. Le Guin. Reread, for classics book group. So good! Thirty years ago the exploration of gender interested me most, but now it is the politics, power, status, loyalty.

The book has also changed between readings because I fell in love with Due South, and now I cannot not see Estraven and Genly Ai as alternate-universe Fraser and Kowalski. Especially when Estraven does something amazingly competent. Or lets you see how hard it is on him to do something dishonorable, even when the end absolutely does justify the means. Or writes, about Genly, "He endures the cold pretty well, and if courage were enough, would stand it like a snow-worm." I wonder how many fics in which Fraser keeps a journal, or encourages Ray to, and then after the Quest one of them reads the other's journal, were inspired by Estraven's journals more than Bob's?

• What do you think you’ll read next?

A spool of blue thread, by Anne Tyler, for Tawanda book group.
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• What are you reading?

The Left Hand of Darkness, by Ursula K. Le Guin, for classics book group. I've read this multiple times, but the last time I remember was on a summer vacation with Neal when I was 19. We were camping in Glacier National Park when Genly Ai and Estraven were out on the ice; if I remember right, it snowed on July 4, and we woke up to a mountain goat with a baby mountain goat investigating our campsite. The baby cavorted as baby goats do.

• What did you recently finish reading?

All About Love, by bell hooks, because my daughter read it and wanted to discuss it. I'm going to have to read this one again sometime. Hooks says she found a meaningful definition of love in M. Scott Peck's The Road Less Traveled: "the will to extend one's self for the purpose of nurturing one's own or another's spiritual growth." I thought hooks had a lot of useful things to say about how abuse, dishonesty, and injustice damage love, but I still don't understand that initial definition.

• What do you think you’ll read next?

The Buried Giant, by Kazuo Ishiguro, for SF book group.

xmas books

Dec. 30th, 2016 02:04 am
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I got A Small Furry Prayer: Dog Rescue and the Meaning of Life, by Steven Kotler, from my son.
I gave my nieces Cornelia Funke's Inkheart and Rachel Hartman's Seraphina.
I gave my older child
Naomi Novik's Uprooted,
Rebecca Solnit's Men Explain Things to Me,
Ted Chiang's Stories of Your Life and Others, though it did not persuade her to see Arrival with me,
Zen Cho's Sorcerer to the Crown,
Becky Chambers's The Long Way to a Small Angry Planet,
Katherine Addison's The Goblin Emperor,
and Sydney Padua's The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babbage.
I gave my younger child
Ben Aaronovitch's Broken Homes and Foxglove Summer,
Lev Grossman's Codex,
M. J. Locke's Up Against It,
Martha Wells's The Serpent Sea,
and Carla Speed McNeil's Finder.
I also wanted him to try Nine Princes in Amber, but somewhere over the years I lost my SFBC copy. My library has the giant 10-books-in-one compilation, so I checked that out; he'll only be here for a few more days, but he can read one or two and decided whether he'd like to finish. I think I'll dig out Doorways in the Sand for him too.

• What are you reading?

Detroit City is the Place to Be, by Mark Binelli. A bit about how Detroit got to be that way, a bit about what its possibilities are, but mostly about what it is like to live in Detroit now. Very interesting.

• What did you recently finish reading?

Death by Silver, by Melissa Scott & Amy Griswold.

• What do you think you’ll read next?

My book groups' books for January:
Uprooted, by Naomi Novik
Americanah, by Chimimanda Ngozie Adichie
The Canterbury Tales, by Geoffrey Chaucer, translated by Sheila Fisher

My fourth book group will be meeting in January, but we're not reading a book. The plan is to learn to knit a pussy hat.
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My library's website's featured books this week are

10 steps to mastering stress : a lifestyle approach
The book of joy : lasting happiness in a changing world / His Holiness the Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu, with Douglas Abrams
Don't give up, don't give in : lessons from an extraordinary life / Louis Zamperini and David Rensin
Instructions for a broken heart / By Kim Culbertson
Meditation made easy : more than 50 exercises for peace, relaxation, & mindfulness

Do you think they're trying to tell us something?

Rebecca Solnit, author of "Men Explain Things to Me" and A Paradise Built in Hell, is offering the ebook of her Hope in the Dark: Untold Histories, Wild Possibilities free, for four more days.

https://www.haymarketbooks.org/books/791-hope-in-the-dark?discount_code=FREEHOPEINTHEDARK
Your opponents would love you to believe that it’s hopeless, that you have no power, that there’s no reason to act, that you can’t win. Hope is a gift you don’t have to surrender, a power you don’t have to throw away. And though hope can be an act of defiance, defiance isn’t enough reason to hope. But there are good reasons.
I wrote this book in 2003 and early 2004 to make the case for hope. The text that follows is in some ways of its moment—it was written against the tremendous despair at the height of the Bush administration’s powers and the outset of the war in Iraq. That moment passed long ago, but despair, defeatism, cynicism, and the amnesia and assumptions from which they often arise have not dispersed, even as the most wildly, unimaginably magnificent things came to pass. There is a lot of evidence for the defense.
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On Wednesday! But not from this Wednesday. I opened the post window to write about something else and found this.

• What are you reading?

This One Summer, by Mariko Tamaki and Jillian Tamaki. I love the art; everyone has their own face, so real and individual that if I met these people on the street I would recognize them. What it focuses on and what it looks away from feel appropriate to that one summer when you are coming to grips with the fact that boobs apply to you -- not some future you, who will have become a woman and understood all those things that you will understand when you're older, but the real you, the you that you are.

• What did you recently finish reading?

Audiobook of Breakfast of Champions, by Kurt Vonnegut, read by Stanley Tucci. I just wanted Stanley Tucci to read me a bedtime story. I was delighted to find Breakfast of Champions still good! Still sexist, yeah, but 70% less annoying than Even Cowgirls Get The Blues. Maybe because Vonnegut isn't kidding himself that he understands women? The biggest change it has undergone is that thirty years ago, "asshole" and the n-word were about equally shocking.

• What do you think you’ll read next?

Ninefox Gambit, by Yoon Ha Lee, for SF book group.


Checked out from the library:

This one summer / Mariko Tamaki, Jillian Tamaki.
Deathless / Catherynne M. Valente.
Six-gun Snow White / Catherynne M. Valente ; with illustrations by Charlie Bowater.
The eyes of the dragon : a story / by Stephen King ; with illustrations by David Palladini.
A man called Ove : a novel / Fredrik Backman.
The grand Sophy / Georgette Heyer.

The hunger games [videorecording]
Man up [videorecording] /
Far from the madding crowd [videorecording] /
Fortitude [videorecording] /
Deadpool [videorecording] /
Orphan black. Season three /

Dogs : a startling new understanding of canine origin, behavior, and evolution / Raymond Coppinger and Lorna Coppinger.
Dog tricks : fun and games for your clever canine / Mary Ray, Justine Harding.
Detroit City is the place to be : the afterlife of an American metropolis / Mark Binelli.
Zombie spaceship wasteland : a book / by Patton Oswalt.
Second reading : notable and neglected books revisited / Jonathan Yardley
Wild: from lost to found on the Pacific Crest Trail / Cheryl Strayed.
When breath becomes air / Paul Kalanithi ; foreword by Abraham Verghese.
Being mortal : medicine and what matters in the end / Atul Gawande.

Eyes bigger than my... eyes, I guess?

a book list

Aug. 9th, 2016 01:38 am
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A list, from [personal profile] firecat, of 60 SF books, which I have resorted into three groups:

I've read these:

The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood
Cordelia's Honor by Lois McMaster Bujold
War for the Oaks by Emma Bull
Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler
Synners by Pat Cadigan
Foreigner by C.J. Cherryh
Tam Lin by Pamela Dean
Fly by Night by Frances Hardinge
The God Stalker Chronicles by P.C. Hodgell
Brown Girl in the Ring by Nalo Hopkinson
God's War by Kameron Hurley
The Killing Moon by N.K. Jemisin
Howl's Moving Castle by Diana Wynne Jones
The Steerswoman by Rosemary Kirstein
Beggars in Spain by Nancy Kress
A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle
Tender Morsels by Margo Lanagan
The Dispossessed by Ursula K. Le Guin
Ancillary Justice by Ann Leckie
Dragonsong by Anne McCaffrey
Dreamsnake by Vonda N. McIntyre
Sunshine by Robin McKinley
His Majesty's Dragon by Naomi Novik
Who Fears Death by Nnedi Okorafor
The Female Man by Joanna Russ
A Door Into Ocean by Joan Slonczewski
Her Smoke Rose Up Forever by James Tiptree, Jr.
The Snow Queen by Joan D. Vinge
Farthing by Jo Walton
The Cloud Roads by Martha Wells
To Say Nothing of the Dog by Connie Willis

I have not read these, but have read something else by the author:

Range of Ghosts by Elizabeth Bear
Tithe by Holly Black
Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell by Susanna Clarke
King's Dragon by Kate Elliott
Slow River by Nicola Griffith
Dragonsbane by Barbara Hambly
Old Man's War by John Scalzi
The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making by Catherynne M. Valente

I have not read these:

Grimspace by Ann Aguirre
Primary Inversion by Catherine Asaro
Flesh and Spirit by Carol Berg
Chime by Franny Billingsley
Daughter of the Blood by Anne Bishop
The Long Tomorrow by Leigh Brackett
Survival by Julie E. Czerneda
Black Sun Rising by C.S. Friedman
Assassin's Apprentice by Robin Hobb
Valor's Choice by Tanya Huff
Daggerspell by Katharine Kerr
Deryni Rising by Katherine Kurtz
Ash by Malinda Lo
Warchild by Karin Lowachee
Legend by Marie Lu
Rosemary and Rue by Seanan McGuire
The Thief's Gamble by Juliet E. McKenna
Diving into the Wreck by Kristine Kathryn Rusch
The Grass King's Concubine by Kari Sperring
The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater
City of Pearl by Karen Traviss

I think this says that I am old. The newer a book is, the less likely I am to read it.

Is there a book in the first group you'd like me to review?
Is there a book in the second or third groups you think I should read?
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• What are you reading?

The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August, by Claire North. I find Harry's predicament interesting, but not himself. I probably wouldn't finish if it weren't for SF bookgroup.

• What did you recently finish reading?

The Family Fang, by Kevin Wilson. Says interesting things about performance art.

• What do you think you’ll read next?

Even Cowgirls Get the Blues, by Tom Robbins, for Tawanda bookgroup, this Sunday. I read it decades ago, but I appear not to have a copy, and neither does my library. I suspect I will find that the Sexism Fairy has chewed through this book like a colony of silverfish.
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Packing for Wiscon. One carry-on, one laptop bag, one CPAP. No checked bag. Can fit a paperback in the CPAP bag.

For signing, I could take:

hardcovers:
All the Birds in the Sky, by Charlie Jane Anders
The Chaos, by Nalo Hopkinson
The New Moon's Arms, by Nalo Hopkinson
Liar, by Justine Larbalestier
Magic or Madness, by Justine Larbalestier

trade paperbacks:
A Stranger in Olondria, by Sofia Samatar
Midnight Robber, by Nalo Hopkinson
The Salt Roads, by Nalo Hopkinson
Brown Girl in the Ring, by Nalo Hopkinson
Skin Folk, by Nalo Hopkinson
Sister Mine, by Nalo Hopkinson
Elysium, by Jennifer Marie

Probably not polite to ask an author to sign more than two books.

What to bring for the book swap? Here, the problem is that most of my books are still at my husband's house, and that's where most of the books that I am ready to part with would be. I've got a duplicate copy of Karen Joy Fowler's Sister Noon -- perfect. I've got White Horse, by Alex Adams, which I thought was terrible but maybe someone else won't. If I ever want to read Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World again I know that I will always be able to find a copy. That'll do.
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This is what I've got checked out from the library:

A paradise built in hell : the extraordinary communities that arise in disaster / Rebecca Solnit.
Dog tricks / by Deb M. Eldredge, DVM, and Kate Eldredge ; photography by Beth Adams.
MacBook for dummies / by Mark L. Chambers.
Waterwise landscaping with trees, shrubs & vines : a xeriscape guide for the Rocky Mountain region, California & the desert Southwest / by Jim Knopf.
Better living through criticism : how to think about art, pleasure, beauty, and truth / A. O. Scott.


Watership Down / Richard Adams.
Ex Machina. Book One / Brian K. Vaughan, Tony Harris.
Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell / Susanna Clarke ; illustrations by Portia Rosenberg.
Deathless / Catherynne M. Valente.
Go set a watchman / Harper Lee.
People of the book : a novel / Geraldine Brooks.
After Alice : a novel / Gregory Maguire.
Riding freedom / written by Pam Muñoz Ryan ; drawings by Brian Selznick.
Lagoon / Nnedi Okorafor.
We are pirates : a novel / Daniel Handler.
The good, the bad and the smug / Tom Holt.
Carol / Patricia Highsmith.
The horizontal man.
East of Eden / John Steinbeck

Deadwood. The complete third season [videorecording] / Home Box Office ; Roscoe Productions.
My old lady [videorecording] / Cohen Media Group and BBC Films ; produced by Rachael Horovitz ... [et al.] ; written and directed by Israel Horovitz.
Arrested development. Season four / Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation.
Labyrinth [videorecording] / Henson Associates, inc. and LucasFilm Ltd. ; producer, Eric Rattray ; story by Dennis Lee and Jim Henson ; screenplay, Terry Jones ; director, Jim Henson.
Masters of sex. The complete second / Sony Pictures Home Entertainment.
The man from U.N.C.L.E. [videorecording] / writers, Guy Ritchie, Lionel Wigram ; producers, John Davis, Steve Clark-Hall, Lionel Wigram, Guy Ritchie ; director, Guy Ritchie.
Orphan black. Season three / produced by Alex Levin, Claire Welland, Aubrey Nealon, Tatiana Maslany ; written by Chris Roberts, Alex Levin, Hannah Cheesman, Lynn Coady, Aubrey Nealon, Russ Cochrane ; directed by John Fawcett, David Frazee, Helen Shaver, Chris Grismer.

What should I read instead, given that it is less than four weeks till Wiscon?
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So the book group that is hosted by the library meets in August to choose books for the year. Everyone who attends that meeting gets to propose a book; then everyone writes down their top six choices, and we read the ones that get the most votes. I did not attend last August, so I didn't witness the selection, but we are going to read a book that was written by a member of the book club. He is also going to facilitate the discussion, since it is the custom for the person who proposes the book to be the facilitator, although one can ask the librarian who runs the book group to facilitate in one's stead.

I think this is a terrible idea.

Also I have no idea how to talk about a book in front of its author, even if I don't care about the author, which is not the case here, even if I like the book, which hmmm. I have developed a little skill at beta-reading, but that is different: there, you are criticizing only what the author wants criticized, in order to improve the work before she publishes it. Here, I don't know what he wants from the discussion but I don't think he's going to get it.
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This year, my SF book group's fearless leader has chosen the theme of diversity. Jacqie picks six, and lets us vote on the other six. Here's her list:

1. Sorcerer to the Crown, by Zen Cho
2. Ninefox Gambit, by Yoon Ha Lee
3. The Traitor Baru Cormorant, by Seth Dickinson
4. Signal to Noise, by Silvia Moreno-Garcia
5. Shadowshaper, by Daniel José Older
6. The Library at Mount Char, by Scott Hawkins

and the groups we get to choose from:

7. The Long Way to a Small Angry Planet, by Becky Chambers
Dark Orbit, by Carolyn Ives Gilman
Planetfall, by Emma Newman, or
Archangel, by Marguerite Reed

8. Wake of Vultures, by Lila Bowen
Vermilion, by Molly Tanzer, or
Orlando, by Virginia Woolf

9. Gene Mapper, by Taiyo Fujii, or
The Three-Body Problem, by Cixin Liu

10. The Buried Giant, by Kazuo Ishiguro
The Grace of Kings, by Ken Liu, or
The People in the Trees, by Hanya Yanagihara

11. Illuminae, by Amie Kaufman
Uprooted, by Naomi Novik, or
An Ember in the Ashes, by Sabaa Tahir

12. All the Birds in the Sky, by Charlie Jane Anders
Slade House, by David Mitchell
The Cloud Roads, by Martha Wells, or
The Affinites, by Robert Charles Wilson

Isn't that a good list? What would you choose? I'm going to be conflicted between All the Birds in the Sky, which I very much want to read, and The Cloud Roads, which I always want to make more people read.
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[personal profile] lightreads reread Children of Morrow and Treasures of Morrow by H.M. Hoover, and I commented
There was a time when eugenics was all over SF written by women. And I was reading SF during that time, but I was a kid, and didn't notice it.

I am curious about it now, and I wonder:

What time period was that, exactly? [I'm thinking of the seventies]
Is my sense that it was more common in books by women than by men correct? If so, why?
What were they thinking?
Why did it stop?

Would you say that these are books I should include if I make an investigation of the phenomenon?


Can you think of any books I should include if I want to take a broad look at eugenics in SF? When I say eugenics I mean an attempt to improve the human race through selective breeding, not genetic engineering. And for this I'm not interested in books about breeding for The Perfect Child that has been foretold unto us, who will save the world; that trope is also creepy, but different.
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I have 23 items checked out from the library:

This year you write your novel / Walter Mosley.
Barn owl / David Chandler.
Making origami masks step by step / Michael G. LaFosse
The checklist manifesto : how to get things right / Atul Gawande.
Age of contradiction : American thought and culture in the 1960s / Howard Brick.
Bad feminist : essays / Roxane Gay.
A paradise built in hell : the extraordinary communities that arise in disaster / Rebecca Solnit.
The gift : creativity and the artist in the modern world / Lewis Hyde.

Hotel du Lac / Anita Brookner.
Dead to me / Cath Staincliffe.
Persona / Genevieve Valentine.
Deathless / Catherynne M. Valente.
Ancillary sword / Ann Leckie.
Watership Down / Richard Adams.
Ex Machina. Book One / Brian K. Vaughan, Tony Harris.

Californication. The second season
Silicon Valley. The complete first season
The theory of everything
Borgen. Season 1
Deadwood. The complete second season [
Home
Boy meets girl
Clouds of Sils Maria

Plus 2 items on my Overdrive account:

What's a dog for? : the surprising history, science, philosophy, and politics of man's best friend / John Homans
The scarlet letter [electronic resource] / by Nathaniel Hawthorne

18 items on my hold list, of which 6 are fiction, 4 are non-fiction, and 8 are movies or TV shows. 1 is ready for pickup, 11 are frozen, 6 I probably should freeze even though their waitlists are really long.

That's close to normal fiction/nonfiction ratio for me. I don't read nearly as much nonfiction as fiction, but I keep them a lot longer. Even so, half of those are probably going to go back unfinished. This is the second time I've had A Paradise Built In Hell out, and it's going to go back unfinished again, and I'll cycle through the waitlist again. I should just buy it, but then it would keep getting bumped by books with time pressure.

It's Nixie who's reading The Gift, not me. Only 24 of those items are mine!

4 of them are for book groups. 3 of them are books I already own, but I can't find them right now and I need to read them right now. I have no idea how that situation with the TV shows happened. No idea.

What does your to-read pile look like?
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This book sounds so wonderful I don't ever want to read it no real thing could live up to this description: Welcome to Mars, by James Blish.
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I've got two nieces, 10 and 13, both read a lot. The last time I saw them, I gave the 13-year-old A Natural History of Dragons. Turns out she *loves* dragons, so I lucked out there. The book she was reading was The Life of Pi. I gave the 10-year-old The True Meaning of Smekday, which I was worried might be a little young for her, but I love that book so much I wanted to share it, and it turns out that like most avid readers, she enjoys things intended for older and younger people.

So I'm casting my mind around for Christmas presents. I haven't read Uprooted, but it seems very popular among my reading list. Maybe Seraphina, but a kid who loves dragons has probably read it already. The Cloud Roads wouldn't be too mature for a kid who chose to read Life of Pi, right?

Do you have any suggestions?
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[personal profile] dingsi asked for book suggestions, and I made some even though I get anxious recommending books to people I don't know.
I want to suggest three women of color who write excellent books that haven't been suggested yet, but all these books have content that I have to warn for while recommending them. They are all fantasy, but not the kind of fantasy that escapes from the fact that if you're a woman of color, some people will treat your body as if it were their property.

What makes these books so great is that they are about living a joyful autonomous life anyway.

Redwood and Wildfire, by Andrea Hairston, is set at the beginning of the 20th century, in the swampland of Georgia and then in the theater and film world of Chicago. The protagonist is a Black woman learning to use her magic and her storytelling power. The other main character is a mixed-race Native American and white man. Warnings for a lynching, a rape, alcoholism, and the fact that there is eventually a romance between characters who became friends while one of them was an adult and the other was a child.

Nalo Hopkinson's work is multicultural, feminist, queer, and intersectional. Midnight Robber is the one I read first and still my favorite, but the protagonist is raped by her father. Sister Mine has a Caribbean family of gods living in modern-day Toronto. Warning for consensual incest between conjoined twins. The Salt Roads has three protagonists, in 18th-century Haiti, 19th-century Paris, and ancient Egypt, connected by a goddess and the struggle for freedom. Warning for slavery and prostitution.

Octavia Butler wrote some of the most worthwhile and most troubling books I have ever read. I don;t even know where to start talking about them. Fledgling is about vampires, but it will take you straight into the heart of the problem Butler never stopped struggling with: the way our biology drives us to violate other people's autonomy. She alienates the problem by telling stories in which the exploiters are a different species than the people they use, but you can't not see the light these stories cast on the way men use women, the way white people use Black people, the way fetuses use their mothers.
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• What are you reading?

In Real Life, by Cory Doctorow and Jen Wang.

• What did you recently finish reading?

A Natural History of Dragons, by Marie Brennan. Enjoyable. Not enough dragon. I like the main character, especially her passion for dragons. The things I don't like about her, like her tendency to treat the people around her as means to her own ends instead of ends in themselves, are believable for her age (nineteen) and status (gentlewoman in not-Victorian England). I liked her marriage: it started as a marriage of convenience, really, on her part (she wanted access to his library!) but grew into friendship and partnership. I wish we had gotten to see more of that, too.

• What do you think you’ll read next?

Next book club books are The Good Lord Bird and The Golem and the Jinni, but I also have Stranger, by Sherwood Smith and Rachel Manija Brown, out from the library.
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• What are you reading?

The ghost in the electric blue suit, by Graham Joyce. The thing I love about Graham Joyce is that I can't tell before I open the book whether what looks like magic will turn out to be magic, not magic, or undecidable. He has written all three. I think this one will be magic, but the young man protagonist is facing temptations/dangers in sex, in politics, in education, in family ties, and in a past tragic event that he can't remember, as well as the one a surly caretaker warns him about: "Don't lend 'em any money. Don't buy 'em a beer. You can lend 'em a cigarette. A cigarette is all right. One cigarette. Not two. One cigarette is all right. Don't tell 'em nothing they don't need to know. Nothing. Be all right."

• What did you recently finish reading?

The Countess Conspiracy, by Courtney Milan. Enjoyable.

• What do you think you’ll read next?

A Natural History of Dragons, by Marie Brennan, for SF book group.
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While he was still in Montreal Mungo wrote
I've read all the books I brought with me & half of my neighbors. When I come back to Colorado can I borrow some to take with me? (What I'm really asking is if you'll make me a pile that you think I might like)
I know it's a pain because you don't know what type of books I like & i apologize, I just don't really know what things I like in a book either as silly as it sounds


I do wonder where he is finding all this time to read, but let's not talk about that. In the twelve days he's been home he read We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves, all of Digger, Dodger, and now he's reading Swimming To Antarctica, which was one of his dad's suggestions.

When he was a little boy, I was very good at picking out books for him; the geeky little boy in me had excellent taste. It's been a lot harder since he started high school.

My suggestions so far:

The Magicians, by Lev Grossman
Leviathan Wakes, by James S.A. Corey
Fool on the Hill, by Matt Ruff
Moo, by Jane Smiley
All Over Creation, by Ruth Ozeki
The Diamond Age, by Neal Stephenson
The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, by Sherman Alexie
House of Leaves, by Mark Z. Danielewski
Good Omens, by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman
Foreigner, by C. J. Cherryh
whatever I've got on the shelves by Kurt Vonnegut

I keep being tempted to put Oglaf on the stack, opening it, and realizing that no that would be weird.

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